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760+ Persuasion Quotes By Jane Austen (2024) Gems

In the world of classic literature, Jane Austen's timeless novel "Persuasion" remains a jewel in the literary crown, celebrated for its wit, social commentary, and exploration of matters of the heart. Within its pages, Austen weaves a narrative rich in nuance and subtlety, capturing the complexities of human relationships and the enduring themes of love, persuasion, and second chances.

As we delve into the world of "Persuasion Quotes By Jane Austen," we embark on a journey through the words of one of the most beloved authors in English literature. Jane Austen's ability to craft characters and dialogue that resonate with readers has made her a literary icon, and her quotes from "Persuasion" are no exception. 

Persuasion Quotes By Jane Austen (2024)

Persuasion Quotes By Jane Austen (2024)

Jane Austen's novel "Persuasion" is a treasure trove of eloquent quotes that offer insight into the nuances of society, love, and the human heart. With a keen eye for character and a wit that has stood the test of time, Austen's words continue to captivate readers, providing a window into the world of 19th-century England and the timeless complexities of human relationships. 

  • "I am half agony, half hope."
  • "You pierce my soul."
  • "All the privilege I claim for my sex… is that of loving longest when existence or when hope is gone."
  • "I must learn to brook being happier than I deserve."
  • "My idea of good company… is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation."
  • "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged, but one word from you will silence me on this subject forever."
  • "The last few hours were certainly very painful," replied Anne: "but when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure."
  • "There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison."
  • "I hate to be neat and clean. I'm all on the side of dirt; I wish we could see more of it; and do more of it."
  • "I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone forever."
  • "I can no longer listen in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope."
  • "I can no longer bear this silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope."
  • "All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it) is that of loving longest when existence or when hope is gone."
  • "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged, but one word from you will silence me on this subject forever."
  • "I cannot listen in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone forever."
  • "You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope."
  • "All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it) is that of loving longest when existence or when hope is gone."
  • "If I was wrong in yielding to persuasion once, remember that it was to persuasion exerted on the side of safety, not of risk."
  • "In another moment, however, she found herself in the state of being released from him and retreating rapidly towards the protection of the drawing-room."
  • "There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves; it is not my nature."
  • "She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped."
  • "My idea of good company, Mr. Elliot, is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation."
  • "You are too generous to trifle with me."
  • "I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy."
  • "We none of us expect to be in smooth water all our days."
  • "All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it), is that of loving longest when existence or when hope is gone!"
  • "You are too good, I am too bad, and it is altogether too presumptuous."
  • "You are too wise not to know that there are no guarantees in love."
  • "My love, you must not doubt me."
  • "She was his goddess; she was his chance of future happiness."
Persuasion Quotes By Jane Austen-OnlyCaptions

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  • "I have been used to the gratification of believing myself to earn every blessing that I enjoyed."
  • "It sometimes happens that a woman is more handsome at twenty-nine than she was ten years before."
  • "The dread of a future war, which she had always, however, treated as inevitable, was closer upon her now than it had ever been before."
  • "The navy, I think, who have done so much for us, have at least an equal claim with any other set of men for all the comforts and all the privileges which any home can give."
  • "In every argument with her mother, Miss Elliot was habitually convinced that her mother was the sole obstacle to their good understanding."
  • "She was all unreserve to Anne."
  • "They were gradually acquainted, and when acquainted, rapidly and deeply in love."
  • "I hate to be obstinate, but that is the only thing to be done."
  • "Do not be afraid of my running into any excess, of my encroaching on your privilege of universal goodwill."
  • "We are so totally unlike that it is very odd."
  • "I would have lost fifty if necessary, but I would not have sent for you."
  • "I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach."
  • "One day's perfect happiness secured the bliss of another, and the next, and the next."
  • "It was but the same truth which she had been made acquainted with at first."
  • "To be sure, you know no actual good of me—but nobody thinks of that when they fall in love."
  • "No, no, you were better employed."
  • "My first wish is to see you."
  • "I must go, uncertain of my fate, but I shall return hither or follow your party, as soon as possible."
  • "I can no longer doubt your love."
  • "My soul, my life, my everything."
  • "You must not doubt me, Madam."
  • "I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach."
  • "Your passion for sea-faring seemed, before, your ruling inclination."
  • "She was persuaded that under every disadvantage of disapprobation at home, and every anxiety attending his profession, all their probable fears, delays, and disappointments, she should yet have been a happier woman in maintaining the engagement than she had been in the sacrifice of it."
  • "He is only a civilian."
  • "Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death."
  • "His heart was a grave."
  • "I wish I might take this for a compliment, but to be so easily seen through, I am afraid, is pitiful."
  • "She had felt the impossibility of encouraging his affection, however warmly she might regard it."
  • "A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment."
Persuasion Quotes By Jane Austen 2-OnlyCaptions
  • "I am not proud, but I am happy, and happiness blinds, I think, more than pride."
  • "All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it) is that of loving longest when existence or when hope is gone."
  • "It was, perhaps, one of those cases in which advice is good or bad only as the event decides."
  • "I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look, or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun."
  • "My idea of good company…is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company."
  • "The memory of the heart, are you fond of that phrase?"
  • "But I hate to hear you talking so like a fine gentleman and as if women were all fine ladies instead of rational creatures."
  • "One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best."
  • "All the privilege I claim for my own sex…is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone."
  • "Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left."
  • "Every moment has its pleasures and its hope."
  • "You are too good. Your sweetness and disinterestedness are really angelic; I do not know what to say to you."
  • "We are not born to be in love all the time."
  • "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged, but one word from you will silence me on this subject forever."
  • "I hate to be thought of as one of those young women who want to be in love."
  • "You know that I am not a romantic."
  • "When pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure."
  • "I have been thinking it over again, and I am quite determined to go on Saturday and to go by myself."
  • "I can listen no longer in silence. I must speak to you by such means as are within my reach. You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope."
  • "All the privilege I claim for my own sex… is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone."
  • "You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once."
  • "My idea of good company… is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company."
  • "There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved."
  • "Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands."
  • "She knew not how to reconcile two such very different claims as Miss Crawford's, in a man whom she had so reprobated."
  • "I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve."
  • "All the privilege I claim for my own sex (it is not a very enviable one; you need not covet it) is that of loving longest when existence or when hope is gone."
  • "I must be seen to be appreciated."
  • "There is nothing like employment, active indispensable employment, for relieving sorrow."
  • "She hoped to be wise and reasonable in time, but alas! Alas! She must confess to herself that she was not wise yet."
  • "She had been forced into prudence in her youth; she learned romance as she grew older—the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning."
  • "My first wish for all whom I am interested in is that they should be firm. If Louisa Musgrove would be beautiful and happy in her November of life, she will cherish all her present powers of mind."
  • "I wish as well as everybody else to be perfectly happy, but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way."
  • "She had not a faultless character, nor a transparent soul… but she was a very good woman, and if her second object was to be sensible and well-judging, her first was to see Captain Wentworth."
  • "I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs all talk of woman's fickleness."
  • "You are too hasty, sir; I always meant to be reasonable."
  • "I am not proud, but I am happy, and happiness blinds, I think, more than pride."
  • "She felt she was ill-used, indeed. Her master might marry her at once. But, as for Capt. Wentworth, he had been cruelly treated."
  • "We certainly do not forget you so soon as you forget us. It is, perhaps, our fate rather than our merit. We cannot help ourselves."
  • "Vanity was the beginning and the end of Sir Walter Elliot's character."
Persuasion Quotes By Jane Austen 3-OnlyCaptions

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In the realm of literature, Jane Austen's timeless wisdom and keen understanding of human nature continue to resonate with readers of all generations. As we navigate the complexities of relationships, societal expectations, and personal growth, Austen's Persuasion Quotes By Jane Austen serve as guiding lights, illuminating the intricate dance of persuasion and persuasion, of choices and consequences.

Through her rich characters and masterful storytelling, Austen invites us to explore the depths of our own hearts and minds, encouraging us to reflect upon the power of persuasion in our own lives.

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